My new project – call out for short film night I’m curating at an exciting new London venue

After a break from working while I’ve been with my baby who is now 6 months, I’m delighted to announce a new project. I’m curating a short film night for an exciting new venue in East London – Poplar Union and I’m looking for short films for this event.
 poplar-union-postcard
Please email me at popcornshorts@poplarunion with an online viewing link (no files) to a short film of around 5mins length if you’d like your work to be considered for the event. There is no theme as this is the first short film night at this venue so its nice and open for any type of short film on any subject.
The deadline to submit by is Monday 27th February and the event will take place on 27th March.
You can find more information about the event here https://poplarunion.com/dev/events/pop-corn-short-film-night/
Do share this on to any filmmaker friends and contacts you have to let them know about the opportunity.
I’m looking forward to watching!
poplar union thumbnail_img_1629

Oscars™ Warm-Up Night at JW3 London

Last Saturday night I was running an Oscars™ Warm-Up Night I had organised at JW3 London – the new Jewish Cultural Community and Arts Centre. For some time I had been planning an evening in celebration of the 86th Academy Awards and we decided that our pre awards event would take place the night before the awards ceremony itself. Here’s what the evening entailed:

JW3 is the place to be for the hottest warm up to the Oscars™! Not only will we be joined by a panel of film industry experts sharing their experiences of the Academy Awards™ and their predictions for awards winners, but we will have our own red carpet, cocktails and a real statuette! Dress in your finest award ceremony attire to create some of your own great photo opportunities. Producer and writer Simon Chinn (Man on WireProject Nim), director Roger Michell (Notting HillHyde Park On HudsonLe Week-End) and film journalist and presenter Nicola Christie are on the panel chaired by film critic Jason Solomons. Simon Chinn will introduce a special screening of Searching for Sugar Man on the final night of its status as winner of the Academy Award™ for Best Documentary Feature. The perfect night out before your perfect night in for the 2014 Oscars™ live coverage the following evening.

the panel of film industry speakers at JW3 London's Oscars Warm - Up Night. Photograph by Blake Ezra Photography

the panel of film industry speakers at JW3 London’s Oscars Warm – Up Night. Photograph by Blake Ezra Photography

 

I set about creating an event which would be one of the hottest warm ups to the Oscars in town! I knew it was important to establish a glam and glitzy atmosphere so the evening would feel special and would also build excitement with our audience and the press. Indeed Londonist website listed the night as the top event for their piece Sparkle And Fizz: Oscar Night Action In London and the Ham and High also included the event as one of their Top Five Things To Do In Hampstead and Highgate for that week.

my brother and I in the audience at JW3's Oscars Warm - Up Night. Photography by Blake Ezra Photography

my brother and I in the stylish audience enjoying JW3’s Oscars Warm – Up Night. Photography by Blake Ezra Photography

Londonist - Sparkle And Fizz: Oscar Night Action In London

Londonist lists JW3’s Oscars Warm – Up Night as their number one event for the piece ‘Sparkle And Fizz: Oscar Night Action In London’

So I worked with my colleagues to create a JW3 branded backdrop for a photo opp area with a red carpet so people could pose with the real Oscar statuette from two time Academy Award winning producer Simon Chinn. We arranged for a professional photographer to be there on the night to take photographs of people with the statuette, dressed in their best awards ceremony attire. Plus we dressed up the event hall where the panel talk was taking place so it would look special and we also made sure there was popcorn in the cafe – bar area of the centre with an award themed soundtrack and image slideshow playing as guests enjoyed cocktails and canapés.

holding a real Oscar at JW3's Oscars Warm - Up Night. Photograph by Blake Ezra Photography.

me holding a real Oscar at JW3’s Oscars Warm – Up Night. Photograph by Blake Ezra Photography.

panel of speakers at JW3's Oscars Warm - Up Night

panel of speakers at JW3’s Oscars Warm – Up Night. L-R film critic Jason Solomons, the panel’s chair, film presenter & journalist who is also a programmer for UK Jewish Film – Nicola Christie, film director Roger Michell and film producer and writer Simon Chinn. Photography by Blake Ezra Photography.

with my brother Alexander, holding a real Oscar at JW3's Oscars Warm - Up Night. Photograph by Blake Ezra Photography.

with my brother Alexander, holding a real Oscar at JW3’s Oscars Warm – Up Night. Photograph by Blake Ezra Photography.

I was pleased to be able to put together a great range of film industry names (including a film critic, film presenter and journalist, film director and film producer) for panel who spoke about their past experiences of the awards and their predictions for the winners of the awards the next night, which were all absolutely correct! It was an honour and pleasure to meet and host Jason Solomons, Simon Chinn, for a fun and glamorous evening which was enjoyed by all.

It was also a wonderful opportunity to get all dressed up which if you see my writing on this blog about costumes and characters, you’ll know that’s something I love to do! Included in this post are some pictures of the evening dress I wore the evening, that I hadn’t worn since I went to Glyndebourne opera festival!

For for information about my role working at JW3 running London’s newest independent cinema, see the previous blog post here.

holding a real Oscar at JW3's Oscars Warm - Up Night. Photograph by Blake Ezra Photography.

me holding a real Oscar at JW3’s Oscars Warm – Up Night. Photograph by Blake Ezra Photography.

me at  JW3's Oscars Warm - Up Night.

me at JW3’s Oscars Warm – Up Night.

Jewish Chronicle includes pictures from JW3's Oscars Warm-Up Night

Jewish Chronicle newspaper includes pictures from JW3’s Oscars Warm-Up Night, including a photograph of my brother and I. Photographs by Blake Ezra Photography.


DOWNTOWN – SYNESTHESIA II at Notting Hill Arts Club

Announcing DOWNTOWN – the second in the SYNESTHESIA series of visual arts exhibitions with live sounds, moving image and projections, curated by me – Kate Ross.

digital flyer for DOWNTOWN at Notting Hill Arts Club 8th August 2013

digital flyer for DOWNTOWN at Notting Hill Arts Club 8th August 2013

This exhibition brings together work from artists who explore the urban, particularly as realised by the idea of Downtown – the core of a city and its creative heart. However, the artwork in this show is further unified as it relates to an African and specifically Jamaican Downtown of Kingston. The artists whose work is shown in DOWNTOWN have been influenced by Jamaican music, the presence of Jamaican culture in London and its vibrant history which has been brought over from one urban hub to create another.

This exhibition brings together reproduced images of new collages created by Jenny Gordon, photographs and film stills by WhittyGordon Projects from their work in Downtown Kingston, Jamaica and a collection of material collated by Winstan Whitter including flyers, posters and photographs illustrating the story of The Four Aces Club, Dalston.

Artist Jenny Gordon has created new collages for DOWNTOWN which were inspired by sources including nature and found objects such as photographs. Gordon examines concepts of identity, isolation and alienation. Her practice  asks questions about how we inhabit the world both physically and emotionally, by drawing upon her own experiences as a woman of mixed race origin. The resulting negotiations of cultural positioning form the foundation of her enquiry into the dislocations of personal identity and physical belonging. In making these collages, Gordon has enjoyed drawing on her personal memories of visiting the Notting Hill area as a child with her parents and she has also reflected on stories she has been told by them of their experiences of the area during the 1950s when Notting Hill was a hotbed of Jamaican culture.

Clarence - Jenny Gordon, 2013

Clarence – Jenny Gordon, 2013

Whitty Gordon Projects (artists Fiona Whitty & Jenny Gordon) have spent plenty of time exploring the vibrant and bustling urban area that is Downtown Kingston, Jamaica for the past three years. In Kingston, Downtown is the heart of the city where the action happens and creative activity is buzzing on the streets. Downtown is a melting pot of diverse communities – pouring out onto the pavements from dilapidated buildings and all walks of life are seen including carpenters, young artists, street hair dressers, barbers, musicians, nail technicians and street food merchants who artists Whitty and Gordon have met and filmed.

Street side hairdressers in Downtown Kingston, Jamaica. Photograph by WhittyGordon Projects.

Street side hairdressers in Downtown Kingston, Jamaica. Photograph by WhittyGordon Projects.

Printed stills taken from short films and photographs by Whitty Gordon Projects are being displayed in the exhibition DOWNTOWN to evoke something of the Jamaican urban hub that artists Fiona and Jenny experienced and are fascinated by. The gap between Downtown and Uptown is large in many terms and both artists have worked hard with local communities to bridge it through collaborative creative projects.

The Honeys In Traditional African outfits. Straight out of Ben E King’s show at the Four Aces Club in 1969, timeless. Collection of Newton Dunbar, photographer unknown. Image from Winstan Whitter

The Honeys In Traditional African outfits. Straight out of Ben E King’s show at the Four Aces Club in 1969, timeless. Collection of Newton Dunbar, photographer unknown. Image from Winstan Whitter

Film maker and Director of Photography Winstan Whitter started out making skateboarding films in the ‘90s and has since worked on short films, commercials, documentary feature films and music promos for artists including Echo & The Bunny men, Scissor Sisters, Lionel Ritchie and Paul McCartney. In 2008 Whitter shot “Legacy In The Dust: The Four Aces Story’’ which tells the story of one of the first Reggae-oriented music venues – ‘The Four Aces Club’. For some 33 years it was home to the most influential black music and musicians to date. DOWNTOWN exhibition at Notting Hill Arts Club is proud to display a number of printed reproduction images of Whitter’s ‘Four Aces Club’ screen-prints therefore linking shared histories of London nightclubs and Jamaican music.

The exhibition DOWNTOWN tells the story of DOWNTOWN through the eyes of the artists and curator with their joint enriching blend of Jamaican, British, Irish, Ghanaian and Jewish cultures.

Live on the Night – DOWNTOWN

Continuing with the SYNESTHESIA series theme of creating a multi sensory experience, as well as the visual arts exhibition, DOWNTOWN will also feature film, moving image, projections, live music and DJ sets.

A curated selection of short films will be shown on the night of 8th August by a range of artist film makers who respond to the theme of DOWNTOWN whether this is in the sense of urban subject matter or other connected identities. Whitty Gordon Projects will also screen a film they made after collecting material when undertaking In-Between Spaces, a film project based in Kingston Jamaica in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

films by

Conor O’ Grady
Eddie Saint-Jean
Fraser Watson
Gabriel Bisset-Smith
Janina Samoles
Laura Arten
Leona Clinton & Mary Caffrey
Patrick Corcoran
WhittyGordon Projects
Winstan Whitter

Sounds

Integral to the atmosphere of downtown Kingston, Jamaica are the sounds on the streets, produced by musicians and those who organise music nights in the area which artists Fiona Whitty & Jenny Gordon have done there themselves. So, DOWNTOWN exhibition too will be accompanied by music from DJs and bands inspired by Jamaican, African urban sounds.

The Artists

WhittyGordon Projects are Fiona Whitty and Jenny Gordon. Fiona and Jenny met during their MA  Fine Art course at Chelsea College of Art and Design, London in 2009. Fiona is Irish and Jenny is British/Jamaican. They received funding to undertake In-Between Spaces, a film project based in Kingston Jamaica in 2010, 2011 and 2012 when made several short films including Yabba Pot, Vincent and Downtown. They formed WhittyGordon Projects in 2011 and have participated in numerous shows in London, Ireland, Jamaica and are currently based in London.

Film maker and Director of Photography Winstan Whitter started out making skateboarding films in the ‘90s and has since worked on short films, commercials, documentary feature films and music promos for artists including Echo & The Bunny men, Scissor Sisters, Lionel Ritchie and Paul McCartney. Whitter also works as a mentor/facilitator on many film making workshops within the educational sector.

Whitty Gordon Projects http://whittygordonprojects.tumblr.com

Jenny Gordon http://jennygordon20.tumblr.com/

Winstan Whitter http://www.winstanwhitter.net/

Please join the Facebook event for the night by clicking here


SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club – a successful launch to my new visual art & sound series

projected visuals for SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

projected visuals for SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

The launch of the new visual arts & sound series I am curating for Notting Hill Arts Club was a real success with a great night of art, sounds and music at the Club enjoyed by over 100 people!

Horseless Headmen play live for SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

Horseless Headmen play live for SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

Nicky Carvell‘s ‘Naff Graphic‘ Decals suit the industrial space of the Club perfectly and you can see them on display until the end of July.

work by Nicky Carvell for En Visage - SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

work by Nicky Carvell for En Visage – SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

IKTA performed an excellent  set with experimental layered sounds including pre recorded elements and live playing on saxophones, percussion and electronic beats. On the wall  behind the stage, short films by IKTA members Victoria Trinder, Simon West, Zachary Apo-Tsang  and Rosie Stewart fluttered in the background giving the performance area a more visually heightened atmosphere which worked well with the projections of Nicky Carvell’s specially designed En Visage logo.

Simon West and Victoria Trinder play an IKTA Live set for SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

Simon West and Victoria Trinder play an IKTA Live set for SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

 

the crowd enjoying SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

the crowd enjoying SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

 

Horseless Headmen then played their set with a range of instruments including the biggest saxophone I’ve ever seen, flute, bass guitar, guitar and a number of weird and wonderful percussive items including drums from Nick Cash. Finally, Half an Abortion – Pete Cann tested the limits of the Club’s sound system with his closing set.

En Visage logo by Nicky Carvell for SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

En Visage logo by Nicky Carvell for SYNESTHESIA I at Notting Hill Arts Club

 

 

 

 

 

Special thanks to all the artists involved, Neil the sound technician at the Club and Calum and Dom who I work with at the Club on the series.

More photos from the night can be seen on my Facebook page here and for more information about the artists, please see a previous blog post I wrote here.

I’m looking forward to SYNESTHESIA II which will happen in August with new visual artist, film makers, music and more!


SYNESTHESIA I – launching my new visual art & sound series at Notting Hill Arts Club, curated by Kate Ross – Curatorial Curiosities

The new visual art and sound series that I am curating for Notting Hill Arts Club launches on the evening of Monday 3rd June with SYNESTHESIA I. I chose the name SYNESTHESIA for the series as it describes an experience that I have always been fascinated with, whether in connection to artist Wassily Kandinsky’s ‘music-painting’ or with regards to contemporary artists creating video art that stimulates simultaneous reactions to sight and sound. I also thought that the name SYNESTHESIA sounded like a club night which would work well for the venue – Notting Hill Arts Club. I think the name also stands out clearly and looks eye catching on the flyer that artist Nicky Carvell has designed for the night.

digital flyer for SYNESTHESIA I designed  by Nicky Carvell

digital flyer for SYNESTHESIA I designed by Nicky Carvell

ART SHOW

En Visage – Nicky Carvell

For SYNESTHESIA I Nicky Carvell has produced large-scale ‘Naff Graphic’ decals, mirroring the huge cut outs of musicians and sports people which still adorn the now stripped out interior of the Visage nightclub in Leisure World.

Sorry luv, you’re not dressed right.” Dismissed by the bouncer beneath the glare of the jaunty neon sign, Visage Nightclub was my teenage anathema,’ writes Carvell. ‘Having journeyed to Leisure World with my friends, I was not allowed in again despite the irony that I was the only one dressed in leisure wear, a rejection which embellished the notion of Visage as a glamorous otherworld that I would never experience – it is now due to be demolished.

The title “En Visage” signals this sophistication onto a fantasy land that will remain just that. It is this artificial jazzy sign that still fascinates me; the dream overriding the grotty reality.
Carvell sees her own cut outs as ‘signs’ to an alternate realm where anything is possible. Indulging on the look of ’80s post-modern record covers, fabric prints and TOTP set designs, these signs envisage uplifting visions which fizz before the eyes, dynamically flashing, always on the precipice.
Nicky Carvell’s work celebrates commercial visuals which may be stylistically outdated, but yet retain a powerful presence through their innate dynamism. Carvell sees her work as a simultaneous deconstruction and veneration of mass-market visuals, becoming retro yet progressive at the same time.Nicky Carvell has exhibited in London, New York, Milan and The Netherlands.
She has a BA in Fine Art from Goldsmiths College and a Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art from Royal Academy Schools, London. www.nickycarvell.com

Nicky Carvell’s En Visage works will be on display until August 2013.
Nicky Carvell's En Visage logo designed especially for the exhibition at Notting Hill Arts Club

Nicky Carvell’s En Visage logo designed especially for the exhibition at Notting Hill Arts Club

LIVE PERFORMANCES

IKTA LIVE – Victoria Trinder & Collaborators

IKTA presents a session of experimental sound play, featuring Victoria Trinder and special instrumentalist guests. Working with traditional modes of composition in conjunction with and interactive sound objects that introduce an element of the unpredictable.

IKTA logo

IKTA logo

Victoria Trinder works in collaboration with other creatives operating within a multidisciplinary arena. She highlights and documents exchanges that take place through dialogue and activity, championing the symbiotic relationships that are embedded in our contemporary day-to-day society.

saxophone is amplified  & ready for an IKTA live sessoin

saxophone is amplified & ready for an IKTA live session

Trinder founded IKTA (I Keep Thinking About) an Internet Radio station that acts as a platform for emerging creative voices regardless of age, gender and cultural backgrounds. IKTA broadcasts experimental sound sessions that occur at headquarters in North London.

equipment set up for an IKTA live rehearssal

equipment set up for an IKTA live rehearssal

Victoria Trinder holds a BA in Fine Art and is currently studying for her MA in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design. She has exhibited in the UK and internationally, recently being selected for feature at Pnem Sound Arts Festival, Holland. She holds a Post Graduate Teaching Certificate, obtained from Goldsmiths in 2008 and continues to work with adults and young people in and around London where she lives. www.victoriatrinder.com

HORSELESS HEADMEN

Any band that can play ‘spontaneous soundscapes’ influenced by avant-rock, progressive dub, classical, latin and soul with some electro-industrial and psychedelic skronk have got to be great musicians, and that sure applies to GD Painting and Horseless Headmen, whose improvisations may feature ‘churning groove, soaring melody, glorious racket and epic abstraction.’ Fans of Can, Faust, King Crimson and Song X will like this too. www.facebook.com/HorselessHeads

Horseless Headmen performing

Horseless Headmen performing

HALF AN ABORTION

Half An Abortion is far more considered than the gonzo band name would have you expect: this is carefully-layered, properly physical noise, some of which could be lazily described as ‘harsh’. Yet it actually has a very engaging flow, a wry humour and a structure that invites the listener to climb all over it.

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I am really excited about the first event in the series and invite you all to come and join in at Notting Hill Arts Club. Please join the Facebook event through this link.


I am Curator for Notting Hill Arts Club

I have some exciting news on my career development in curating… I am now curator for Notting Hill Arts Club which is  a specialist pioneering music and arts venue. Here is what Notting Hill Arts Club say about themselves on their website:

Through conceptualising and cultivating niche, underground and genre defining nights, the artsclub has set the musical map of London. Alongside our serious graphic arts based exhibition programme, concept visuals, and extended area-shaping public arts projects, the artsclub is fundamentally explained in its belief that a world created by artists would be a better place.

What and How am I Curating at Notting Hill Arts Club?

I am very excited about this opportunity and I decided to create a new visual art and sound series for Notting Hill Arts Club which I am curating. This new programme reflects my curatorial curiosities, research and practice into new contemporary visual art work by emerging artists, sound art and the idea of the non-gallery space. The series is allowing me the profile  artists whose work I think is cutting edge, interesting and different. I will curate exhibitions around every 2 months and the opening/ private views of these shows will have a whole night created around them with sound and performance artists who I have chosen because their work fits together with the style and ethos of the venue as well as complimenting the artwork to be displayed on the walls of the Club. The process of curating in this non-gallery space is interesting and challenging as the Club is in a basement area, so it is not well lit, therefore I am also choosing art work which is vibrant and will stand out well and is appropriate to the club environment. I am also having to consider the fact that the venue is not an art gallery, so people are using the space to socialise, watch live bands and have a good time so the work needs to be secure so damage is minimised and the work is protected yet can still be enjoyed and on view. For this first exhibition, the images are being printed on matt vinyl which is a resistant material that will stick to the well used club walls like a huge sticker.

the exterior of Notting Hill Arts Club. Sandwiched between a restaurant & a hair salon, you have to be in the know to realise what's beyond the wooden doors... 'small basement, big fun' nottinghill.london.myvillage.com

the exterior of Notting Hill Arts Club. Sandwiched between a restaurant & a hair salon, you have to be in the know to realise what’s beyond the wooden doors… ‘small basement, big fun’ nottinghill.london.myvillage.com

The Idea of a Multi Purpose Arts Space

The Notting Hill Arts Club is the perfect type of venue which matches my interests and strong belief in the idea that the future for showing art work seems to more and more be the multi purpose space, meaning that a venue which artists and curators can work in, also has another strand of revenue in order to keep it going and secure its future. In the case of Notting Hill Arts Club, that’s the live music nights they put on and charge at the door for.

Online Presence and Publicity through Social Media Networks WORKS

I was actually approached by a staff member of the Notting Hill Arts Club team who had been researching artists and curators on the Internet, thanks to this blog where my work was viewed and it appealed to the person who contacted me. I’m a believer in the power of social media and free online publicity for creatives. Its working for me so far! Further to this, I have started a professional Facebook page to keep people updated on my work as a curator and you can join it by clicking here.

In my next post I’ll outline the first exhibition and event curated by me for Notting Hill Arts Club which will be happening soon.


Curating SURFACE exhibition at Chelsea Futurespace gallery

SURFACE is the latest exhibition that I have curated, this time with Daisy McMullan who is my colleague at my workplace CHELSEA space . As part of my role this year as Chelsea Arts Club Trust Fellow  (which you can read about here), Donald Smith – Director of Exhibitions at CHELSEA space informed my colleague and I that there was a gap in the exhibitions programme at our sister gallery Chelsea Futurespace and that we would have the opportunity of curating an exhibition there.

Chelsea Futurespace Exterior

Chelsea Futurespace from exterior to interior during SURFACE private view http://www.chelseaspace.org/blog/archives/2831/cfs-2

The Challenges & Limitations

Chelsea Futurespace is not a space which has the sole function of a gallery.

Chelsea Futurespace is an exemplary collaboration between Chelsea College of Art and Design, Futurecity arts consultancy, and the property developer, St James Urban Living, part of the Berkeley group. It provides a showcase exhibiting space for the alumni and staff of Chelsea College of Art and Design set within St James’ Grosvenor Waterside development at Chelsea Bridge. http://www.chelseafuturespace.org/about.html

So, there are some challenges involved in putting on an exhibition in such a space which is a foyer to a high end residential development where anything from furniture deliveries to dogs and children being walked traipse through, but these can also be looked on as positive opportunities. As mentioned above, Chelsea Futurespace was created as an exhibiting space to showcase specifically work from alumni and staff of Chelsea College of Art and Design, so as curators there was already a structure within which the artists selected would need to fit.

As Chelsea Futurespace is also a living space with the day to day function of being used as the foyer and reception to the whole residential developement, this means that the gallery is part of the residents’ home and many families and children come through the space on a daily basis. So the artwork displayed has to be unobjectionable to viewers and any material that could be seen as explicit or offensive in any way cannot be shown.

Chelsea Futurespace walls

view of two of the exhibiting walls at Chelsea Futurespace during SURFACE exhibition

A practical point that had to be considered is that for exhibiting, the space consists of 4 two-sided walls, each 10ft square ie 8 walls each 10ft/306cm square. These white walls are moveable, but aesthetically and curatorially, navigation and narrative around the show would need to be succesfully achieved so there are only so many possible combinations for the walls which work well. As the space is used constantly for deliveries, as a shortcut and more, any artwork displayed in the space needs to be securely attached to the walls or safe and not pretruding in the way if not directly fastened to the walls.

The Artwork & Theme

So how did we as curators choose the exhibition theme, title, the artists and artworks? We decided that it would be easiest and most efficient to select a broad theme that would allow for a number of different media or artwork to be included into it. I was keen to avoid an exhibition which would only profile one media of artwork and from the start, as Chelsea Futurespace is bright and open, surrounded by large windows and water, I imagined the show to be colourful and rich in variation, interest and technique. The theme of surface allowed for artwork to be exhibited from painting, textiles, collage, drawing, print and objects, therefore crossing the boundaries between fine art, craft and design. I also felt that this range of artwork reflects the multiple areas of practice which are explored by students (and therefore alumni) of Chelsea College of Art & Design.

Charlotte Jonerheim's work at SURFACE exhibition, Chelsea Futurespace, 2013

Charlotte Jonerheim’s work at SURFACE exhibition, Chelsea Futurespace, 2013

Two of the artists I was especially pleased to exhibit work by, were Charlotte Jonerheim, whose work I had admired at the MA Fine Art Chelsea College of Art & Design summer show last year and Brian Chalkley whose work I have written about here. I knew that Charlotte would be able to work successfully in adapting to the limitations of the space as described above and that she would create an installation that was site specific, also using objects from her personal artist’s history which is a method used by Charlotte in her practice. I was determined to have Charlotte’s work included in the show so that there would be objects in the exhibition and not just artworks fixed the wall. In the end, Charlotte used a shelf she had made and a plinth from CHELSEA space to display her work which was the highlight of the show for me, physically coming out of the wall space, yet the delicate nature of the objects were protected.

Charlotte Jonerheim Excavation II 2012-13

Charlotte Jonerheim Excavation II, 2012-13 Cupboard, paint, porcelain, muslin & wax

Charlotte Jonerheim Excavation I 2012-13 Exhibit 1, fringe & wax. Exhibit 2, porcelain figure & surgical gloves. Exhibit 3, plaster, pigment, & bangle. Exhibit 4, porcelain, lamp holder & thread

Charlotte Jonerheim Excavation I 2012-13 Exhibit 1, fringe & wax. Exhibit 2, porcelain figure & surgical gloves. Exhibit 3, plaster, pigment, & bangle. Exhibit 4, porcelain, lamp holder & thread

The work by Brian Chalkley that we decided to show, were his collages which are made using fashion magazine figures that have then been altered by the artist. I love these images which are striking, playful and also prompt us to think about what we see in magazines that is real and what is invented. This couture collage technique is clever and fun.

Brian Chalkley. If you're gonna be on TV and in films, people are gonna look at you in the street, 2012

Brian Chalkley. Collage. If you’re gonna be on TV and in films, people are gonna look at you in the street, 2012

Branding

It was important to us that the branding for the exhibition was clear and consistent, since we also run CHELSEA space, the invitations, press release, mailout and list of works would stick to the Chelsea Futurespace style. We chose a font that was clear and that we liked the look of and each time the exhibition name SURFACE was written, we used the exhibition title font, so that the reader is not confused between the show title and the use of the word surface. Below you can see how the A5 black and white publication we produced matches the style of the invitation card. We chose one of the artworks from the exhibition by Kangwook Lee for the publication booklet cover as well as on the invitation card as it was decorative, detailed and it worked well with the text style.

SURFACE exhibition invite card and publication cover

SURFACE exhibition invite card and     publication cover

the curious curator with Charlotte Jonerheim while installing her work at the SURFACE exhibition at Chelsea Futurespace

the curious curator with Charlotte Jonerheim while installing her work at the SURFACE exhibition at Chelsea Futurespace

Curating the SURFACE exhibition was an enjoyable opportunity, being able to pick and choose artists and work that was to our taste. However, it was also challenging due to working in a multi functioning space with its limitations. The exhibition has been well received and has now been extended until 28th April 2013.